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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, 1806-1836 found in the catalog.

The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, 1806-1836

by Henry deLeon Southerland

  • 381 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by University of Alabama Press in Tuscaloosa .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Federal Road (Ala. and Ga.),
  • Alabama,
  • Georgia
    • Subjects:
    • Creek Indians -- History.,
    • Indians of North America -- Alabama -- History.,
    • Indians of North America -- Georgia -- History.,
    • Federal Road (Ala. and Ga.) -- History.,
    • Alabama -- History -- 1819-1950.,
    • Georgia -- History -- 1775-1865.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementHenry deLeon Southerland, Jr. and Jerry Elijah Brown ; maps by Charles Jefferson Hiers.
      ContributionsBrown, Jerry Elijah, 1945-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsF326 .S73 1989
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxii, 198 p. :
      Number of Pages198
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2057112M
      ISBN 100817304436
      LC Control Number88035698

      By John D. W. Guice, Published on 03/01/ Title. The Federal Road Through Georgia, The Creek Nation, and Alabama, Author: John D. W. Guice. The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama By Southerland, Henry DeLeon and Brown, Jerry Elijah. The University of Alabama Press (). People left the eastern Georgia counties, moving into central Georgia, and then finally, western Georgia. For this reason, one must first search for clues along the Georgia border.

      Apr 28,  · He later turned his history Master's thesis into a much acclaimed book (coauthored with Auburn's Jerry Brown), entitled The Federal Road, Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, Specific Works Relating to the Forts of Georgia. The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation,and Alabama Henry DeLeon Southerland, Jr. and Jerry Elijah Brown. (Univ of Alabama Press ).

      According the book "The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation and Alabama, by Henry Southerland Jr. and Jerry Brown "Alexander Cornells, a member of an extended family of mixed bloods, was also Chief Oche Haujo. Highway History Bibliography Early American Roads and Turnpikes. Interstate System Wagon Roads West: A Study of Federal Road Surveys and Construction in the Trans-Mississippi West Henry DeLeon, Jr., and Brown, Jerry Elijah, The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, , The University of Alabama.


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The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, 1806-1836 by Henry deLeon Southerland Download PDF EPUB FB2

This item: The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, – by Henry deLeon Southerland Jr Paperback $ Only 7 left in stock (more on Cited by: The Federal Road was a major influence in settlement of the Mississippi Territory during the period between the Louisiana Purchase and removal of the Creek Indians.

Histories of early Alabama covering this period are replete with references to isolated incidents along the Federal Road but heretofore no documented history drawn from original.

Sep 26,  · The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, - Kindle edition by Henry deLeon Southerland, Jerry Elijah Brown. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, /5(13). The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, – book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers.

The Feder /5. Old Federal Road Originally designated as a postal route through the Indian frontier, the Federal Road, which stretched through Creek territory in lower Alabama, became a dynamic feature of the geography of the American historical landscape. A second Federal Road, initially called the Georgia Road, passed through Cherokee lands, connecting Savannah, Georgia, with Knoxville, Tennessee.

The NOOK Book (eBook) of the The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, by Henry deLeon Southerland, Jerry Elijah Brown | The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, â" By Henry Deleon Southerland Jr., Jerry Elijah Brown Price: $ Feb 10,  · The federal government played a more direct role in the building of the road through Creek lands.

In the Postal Department oversaw the clearing of a horse path running from Athens to Fort Stoddert, north of Mobile, Alabama, and then on to New Orleans, Louisiana.

In the U.S. Army rerouted and widened this path, adhering closely to the route of the old Lower Creek trading path. The Federal Road through the territory of the Creek people was a project that started in when the Creek gave permission for the development of a "horse path" through their nation for more efficient mail delivery between Washington City (modern-day Washington, D.C.) and New Orleans, Louisiana.

The old road, which evolved from horse path to post road, to military thoroughfare and main path for pioneers to fertile lands, was once a treacherous road from Georgia to Mississippi. It was vital for communication and transportation but it was dangerous for many reasons, chiefly because it ran through the Creek Nation.

Get this from a library. The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, [Henry deLeon Southerland; Jerry Elijah Brown]. Download and save all data of The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, book in one free PDF file. Includes bibliographic data, information about the author of the ebook, description of the e-book and other (if such information is available)/5(10).

The Federal Road Through Georgia: the Creek Nation and Alabama, by Southerland Jr, Henry deLeon, Brown, Jerry Elijah and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at thuoctrigiatruyenbaphuong.com The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, by Jerry Elijah Brown; Southerland, Henry deLeon, Jr.

University of Alabama Press, Paperback. Acceptable. Disclaimer:A readable copy. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. Pages can include considerable notes-in pen or highlighter-but the notes cannot obscure the text. Acting as the interstate highway of its day, when “Alabama Fever” raged through the Carolinas and Georgia, the Old Federal Road carried thousands of pioneers to the Old Southwest.

As such, the Federal Road directly contributed to the dramatic increase in Alabama’s population between and – with Alabama’s population growing. The Federal Road: Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, Henry deLeon Southerland, Jerry Elijah Brown University of Alabama Press, - History - pages.

Fort Stoddert was a stockade fort in the Mississippi Territory, in what is today Alabama. It was located on a bluff of the Mobile River, near modern Mount Vernon, close to the confluence of the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers. It served as the western terminus of the Federal Road which ran through Creek lands to Fort Wilkinson in Georgia.

EBSCOhost serves thousands of libraries with premium essays, articles and other content including The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, (Book).

Get access to over 12 million other articles. THE FEDERAL ROAD through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, HENRY DELEON SOUTHERLAND JR., AND JERRY ELijAH BROWN MAPs BY CHARLES JEFFERSON HIERS Sponsored by the Historic Chattahoochee CommissionCited by: 9.

Click to read more about The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, by Henry deLeon Southerland. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers. All about The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, by Henry deLeon Southerland.

Author: Henry deLeon Southerland. Forts Along the Federal Road Diane Wilcox's page includes excerpts from her book, "Fort Hawkins and Frontier Georgia".

The Federal Road through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama The University of Alabama Press. Passports Through Indian Territory.

The Federal Road began as a postal horsepath through Creek territory, was widened into a military road during the War ofand later became a major thoroughfare for pioneers.

By providing accessibility to Native American land, the road helped precipitate the Creek .Billy Puckett the Federal road did not run through St.

Clair. It entered Ala. (today) near Phenix City, ran along the modern route of US 80 and turned SW after reaching Line Creek a road called the Upper Federal road ran west through Mt.

Meigs to Econchate (later, Montgomery).Jerry E. Brown is the author of The Federal Road Through Georgia, the Creek Nation, and Alabama, – ( avg rating, 19 ratings, 2 reviews, publi /5.